Recent Movies

[IN CINEMAS JUNE 1, 2018] UNTITLED DEADPOOL SEQUEL - TEASER

Untitled Deadpool Sequel (2018)


 

After surviving a near fatal bovine attack, a disfigured cafeteria chef (Wade Wilson) struggles to fulfill his dream of becoming Mayberry's hottest bartender while also learning to cope ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(character), (character) | 2 more credits »

Stars:



After surviving a near fatal bovine attack, a disfigured cafeteria chef (Wade Wilson) struggles to fulfill his dream of becoming Mayberry's hottest bartender while also learning to cope with his lost sense of taste. Searching to regain his spice for life, as well as a flux capacitor, Wade must battle ninjas, the yakuza, and a pack of sexually aggressive canines, as he journeys around the world to discover the importance of family, friendship, and flavor - finding a new taste for adventure and earning the coveted coffee mug title of World's Best Lover. Written by Twentieth Century Fox

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 June 2018 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Love Machine  »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1 
 
Thanks for reading and have fun watching movies.
 

[NOW IN CINEMAS] DADDY'S HOME 2 - REVIEW + HD TRAILER

Daddy's Home 2 (2017)

PG-13 | | Comedy | 10 November 2017 (USA) 


Having finally gotten used to each other's existence, Brad and Dusty must now deal with their intrusive fathers during the holidays.

Director:

Writers:

, (characters) | 1 more credit »

Stars:


Official Sites:

|

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 November 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Guerra de papás 2  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$29,651,193 (North America) (12 November 2017)
 »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1 
 
This movie is a tricky proposition for this reviewer, who also reviewed the first “Daddy’s Home” movie back in 2015. The good news is that I found the sequel better than the original—the writing sharper, the jokes fresher and smarter, the comic interaction between the lead characters consistently engaging. I mentioned this to my incredulous wife, who said, “So you’re saying it’s the ‘Godfather, Part 2’ of the ‘Daddy’s Home’ series.” I’m not sure if she was being sarcastic or not.

Here’s the tricky part. One reason I wasn’t crazy about “Daddy’s Home” was the relentless onslaught of “edgy” jokes in bad taste. This picture tones that down. There are, indeed, fewer jokes at the expense of kids in wheelchairs, and of dogs with open sores and mange. This, to me, is an improvement. But what if you, the reader, actually LIKE jokes about handicapped children and disgustingly pitiable sick dogs? You see the problem.

As for what “Daddy’s Home 2” does have, it’s an expansion of the family dynamic of the first film, which anyone familiar with the “Meet the Parents” films will recognize as an added-star-power strategy. In the post “Daddy’s Home” alliance between cool-bro dad Dusty (Mark Wahlberg) and winsome wimp stepdad Brad (Will Ferrell), a little discontent must fall. Here it arrives in the persons of granddads. Dusty’s pop is alpha-male ex-astronaut Kurt, played by Mel Gibson. Brad’s dad, Don, is a motormouth ultra-limp noodle with a liking for improv comedy, played by John Lithgow. Both granddads arrive at the airport simultaneously, and macho Kurt, who hasn’t seen Dusty in years, is hard-pressed to contain his disgust at the “co-dad” arrangement Dusty and Brad seem so happy in.

Surely the two very different personalities still, as one of the characters puts it, “harbor” some resentment toward each other. (The use and misuse of the word “harbor” becomes a semi-running joke, an almost sophisticated bit of linguistic humor that would absolutely not have floated in the first film.) Kurt is at first passive-aggressive—renting a house near a ski resort to better facilitate a “together Christmas” in the hopes of driving a wedge into Dusty and Brad’s relationship—and then just aggressive, encouraging one of Dusty’s biological children to take up turkey hunting. There are scenes in which both the two dads and the two granddads offer advice and strategies on ten-year-old or so Dylan’s emerging interest in girls, and later his ineptitude at bowling. Brad’s own slapstick ineptitude is highlighted when a runaway snowblower destroys a Christmas decoration display. It’s all pretty amiable and funny, and further intrigue is provided by Dusty’s new wife, Karen, a snooty author with supermodel looks and a snootier daughter, Adrianna, an age peer of Dylan and Megan, Dusty’s kids by Linda Cardellini’s Sarah. Cardellini is given a little more to do in this picture than the first one, and that’s a plus too.

“You’ll laugh,” a friendly publicist assured me on my way into the theater, and I did. Not a huge amount, but enough that I have to adhere to our founder Roger’s rule of comedy assessment, which, most simply put, is that if a comedy made you laugh it did its job and you can’t front about it. I do have to admit I laughed a little less many of the times Gibson was on screen. I praised his work in last year’s tough action thriller “Blood Father,” in which he was very credible as a former criminal struggling with his demons as he tries to protect a wayward daughter. But watching him try to play a bullying character for laughs here left a bad taste in my mouth. His character here is a relentless womanizer, consistently targeting younger women. Knowing how this guy reacts in real life when he feels crossed by a younger girlfriend made it difficult for me to be amused by his portrayal of a grandfather who attempts to entertain some ten-year-olds by starting a joke “So two dead hookers wash up on shore…” And so on.

Your mileage may vary, and I’m sure I’ll hear about how it does in the comments.
 

FINAL RATING: 6/10 FOR THE GENRE & 3/10 OVERLALL.

Thanks for reading and have fun watching movies.

[IN CINEMAS FEBRUARY 14, 2018] THREE BILLBOADS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI - REVIEW + HD TRAILER (10 POINTS)

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)

R | | Comedy, Crime, Drama | 10 November 2017 (USA)/14 February 2018 (International)

Coming Soon

In theaters February 14. 


In this darkly comic drama, a mother personally challenges the local authorities to solve her daughter's murder, when they fail to catch the culprit.

Director:

Writer:

Stars:

 
 
 
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI is a darkly comic drama from Academy Award winner Martin McDonagh (In Bruges). After months have passed without a culprit in her daughter's murder case, Mildred Hayes (Academy Award winner Frances McDormand) makes a bold move, painting three signs leading into her town with a controversial message directed at William Willoughby (Academy Award nominee Woody Harrelson), the town's revered chief of police. When his second-in-command Officer Dixon (Sam Rockwell), an immature mother's boy with a penchant for violence, gets involved, the battle between Mildred and Ebbing's law enforcement is only exacerbated. 
 

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

10 November 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Három óriásplakát Ebbing határában  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$322,168 (North America) (12 November 2017)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

Martin McDonagh wrote the screenplay with Frances McDormand as the lead role in mind. See more »

Quotes

Mildred Hayes: This didn't put an end to shit, you fucking retard; this is just the fucking start. Why don't you put that on your Good Morning Missouri fucking wake up broadcast, bitch?
See more »

Soundtracks

Walk Away Renée
Written by Michael Brown, Bob Calilli and Tony Sansone
Performed by The Four Tops
Courtesy of Motown Records  
 
Anger is an energy in Martin McDonagh’s brilliant “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” one of the best films of the year. In this “Southern American with an Irish attitude” story from the "In Bruges" writer/director that, like a lot of his work, recalls Flannery O’Connor in tone (the O'Connor quote "The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it" could be this movie's tagline), anger is not treated like something to be cured. Hollywood likes to teach us that anger is a sin, and that only through acceptance and understanding can we find true happiness. Easier said than done, right? How can you not be angry at an unfair world? Life will take children before parents. Life will give cancer to relatively young people. Life will be racist, sexist, and cruel. And you should throw a few back and yell at something that unfair. You should fight. It is only through that fighting and that rage that other emotions like empathy and understanding can surface. Anger is not a disease to be cured but a path on the road to comprehending the world.
No one does angry better than Frances McDormand, who does her best film work here since “Fargo” as Mildred Hayes, a recently divorced mother who lost her daughter Angela less than a year ago. Angela was raped and murdered, but the case has gone cold. There was no matching DNA, so the spotlight has dimmed and Mildred is getting no updates. She’s angry. She should be. One day, she sees three barren billboards on a rarely-traveled road, and she rents the space to ask the local chief of police, played by Woody Harrelson, why there are no answers. Local media becomes interested in the billboards, and the attention sparks a series of events involving not only the chief but one of his more loathsome officers, played by Sam Rockwell. Peter Dinklage, Caleb Landry Jones, Abbie Cornish, Lucas Hedges, Clarke Peters, and John Hawkes fill out a ridiculously perfect supporting cast.

You might think you have your finger on what this will be like from that description, but McDonagh’s simply perfect script is never quite what you expect it to be. The mystery of what happened to Angela would have dominated other versions of this story, but this is not really that movie. On one level, it is more about cause and effect than crime and resolution. Mildred rents the billboards, which leads to pressure on the chief, which leads to anger from his loyal officer, and so on and so on down the line. McDonagh spares no one, allowing almost all of his characters to be deeply flawed, especially McDormand’s Mildred and Rockwell’s Dixon. Life has screwed over both of these people, and it has made them both angry. Mildred is channeling her anger to solve her daughter’s murder. Dixon has less of an idea of what to do with his, but one senses early on that it’s probably going to eventually cost him his job.

Rockwell often plays nice guys, but he’s more effective here as a racist, violent cop than you might expect. He looks older and pudgier, like he drinks himself to sleep every night and doesn’t really trust that life has much in store for him. Rockwell has a big arc in this film and he takes no false steps, as usual. Harrelson is great too, but the film belongs to McDormand, who can do more with a withering glare than most actresses can do with a monologue. She is simply stunning when it comes to internal language, so often revealing the pain underneath the rage. Her Mildred takes no prisoners, but also feels like someone literally torn apart inside by grief. McDormand can destroy a monologue, too—a scene with a priest offering counsel is an all-timer, earning applause at my screening—but she’s even more impressive in the minor beats. It’s the curl of a lip to fight back tears or the downward glance to stop herself from punching someone. This character is so completely, fully realized in ways that other actresses couldn’t have come anywhere close to capturing. It’s stunning to watch.

Of course, McDonagh deserves a ton of credit for not only directing her but giving her such a great part in such a smart script. Empathy and peace with the too-common injustice of our world is a common theme in cinema, but it’s usually handled with kid gloves or pat resolutions. There are no easy answers in McDonagh’s world—no clear-cut heroes and villains. You will start to question Mildred and you will start to defend Dixon. In a sense, that’s one of McDonagh’s most stunning tricks with this film. The world is more complex than most movies would have you think, and it takes a writer of his remarkable ability to convey that. He’s also operating at a more technically accomplished level than ever before, particularly in the way the film uses a great score from Coen regular Carter Burwell and well-balanced cinematography from Ben Davis.
Not every speedbump given us by life teaches us tolerance. A daughter shouldn’t die at all, much less brutally. But what do we do with that knowledge? How do we channel our anger at an unjust world? “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” is one of those truly rare films that feels both profound and grounded; inspirational without ever manipulatively trying to be so. Very few recent movies have made me laugh and cry in equal measure as much as this one. Very few films recently are this good.
 

FINAL RATING: 10/10 FOR THE GENRE & 10/10 OVERALL. Lovely movie with an extra portion of sarcasm.

 
Thanks for reading and have fun watching movies. 

[IN CINEMAS NOVEMBER 17] MUDBOUND (2017) - REVIEW + HD TRAILER (10 POINTS)

Mudbound (2017)



Two men return home from World War II to work on a farm in rural Mississippi, where they struggle to deal with racism and adjusting to life after war.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay by), (screenplay by) | 1 more credit »

Stars:


Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 November 2017 (USA)  »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was premiered at The Sundance Film Festival 2017 where it received a standing ovation. See more »

Soundtracks

Mighty River
Written by Mary J. Blige, Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson
Performed by Mary J. Blige

“Mudbound” is all about perception. How it can foster empathy and engender contempt, sometimes in the same person. How it can cause one man to look at his land with life-affirming pride and another man to see that same plot as the kiss of death. How an act of wartime courage involving a red-tailed plane and a dark-skinned pilot can forever alter one’s opinion of a different race. And how a society can impose unfair, harmful and absurd restrictions on an entire group simply because those people are seen as inferior by the powers that be. The film invites us to observe its characters, to hear their inner voices, to see what they see and to challenge our own preconceived notions about race and gender.

This is a period piece that evokes the grand family epics of old Hollywood, most specifically George Stevens’ 1956 film “Giant.” Like George Stevens’ Oscar winner, “Mudbound” is based on a novel and concerns itself with two families living uneasily on the same land. Director Dee Rees masterfully executes her character study, filling the frame with visuals as big and powerful as the emotions she draws from her superb cast. This is melodrama of the highest order, which is a compliment, for melodrama is not a bad thing. It is part of some of the greatest works of art, and in the right hands, it can elicit an ennui-shattering response from the audience.

We will follow two families, the Jacksons, who are Black, and the McAllans, who are White. The McAllan patriarch, Henry (Jason Clarke) is forced to interact with the Jacksons after he is suckered into a deal to buy land that the seller does not legally own. Henry’s embarrassment is amplified by the taunting rants of his racist father Pappy (Jonathan Banks) and the notion that he has to move into an area designated for a lower class of Whites than he believes himself to be. Henry is constantly reminded of his downgraded stature by the repeated appearances of Vera Atwood (Lucy Faust), a struggling, poor White woman whom he deludes himself into thinking is below his station. Vera is Henry’s ghost of Christmas Future, a reminder that he is one mistake away from her desperate existence. For these reasons, Henry despises the land where he resides.
By comparison, pastor Hap Jackson (Rob Morgan) looks at his little plot of land as a gift from God, a blessing that actually elevates his stature from that of his ancestors who couldn’t own land at all. It may be a harsh, at times unforgiving piece of Earth, but he has some form of ownership, no matter how tenuous. Even though Henry has commandeered it mostly for himself, leaving Hap to sharecrop it for diminishing returns, Hap still finds joy, solace and meaning in his farm work. As a Black man in post-WWII America, Hap has become accustomed to making due with even the smallest scraps of good fortune, no matter how infuriating they may seem. Hap is an experienced veteran of the war with Jim Crow; he has bent his anger into a strong, almost impenetrable suit of stoic armor whose weak spots are known only by his loving wife, Florence (Mary J. Blige).
Henry also has a wife, Laura (Carey Mulligan). Through her story, we first become aware that “Mudbound” presents its characters in parallel sets of two. (Rachel Morrison’s cinematography also works in this fashion—notice how each family’s house is lit.) Laura’s partner in this arrangement is Florence, another mother who, like Laura, has the socially accepted role of subservience to her man. Both Florence and Laura buck this trend by disobeying their husbands. They also share a moment of grief that bonds them as only two mothers can bond. As the elder of the two, Florence exhibits a maternal instinct toward Laura.

Laura also gets the first of the film’s internal monologues, moments of voiceover that Rees wrote with Virgil Williams in the adaptation of Hillary Jordan’s novel. Most of the characters have soliloquys that allow us a temporarily omniscient point of view. They provide invaluable information in a fashion that is at times achingly poetic yet completely natural. Florence’s words are especially powerful, rendered by Blige in an excellent performance that mixes the stoicism of Gloria Foster in “Nothing But a Man” with the mischievous twinkle that occasionally popped into a young Cicely Tyson's eye when her characters thought nobody was looking.

Florence and the rest of Hap’s family will be called upon several times to assist the McAllans. Henry’s demands are always delivered in a manner that on the surface sounds like a polite request, yet his tone of voice always stresses that saying no to a White man is not an option. Clarke delivers these lines in squirm-inducing fashion, though the level of discomfort depends on your perception—you may not feel it at all. And though it would appear that Henry has some regard for his counterpart, it becomes clear that he views Hap as too inferior to earn any empathy. Still, “Mudbound” doesn’t treat him as a standard-issue villain; his inner monologues and his interactions with Laura give him a complexity that allows us to understand his actions.

Part of that understanding comes from observing Pappy, a drunk who raised his sons to capitalize on the best White supremacy and privilege have to offer. Pappy has no internal monologues because he’s all surface. His inner voice would sound as racist, corrupt and disgusting as the things everyone hears him say out loud. Banks makes him more than just a one-note character; he’s genuinely menacing and scary enough to dissuade Henry from any sort of racial growth. Henry is bound to his father by guilt, taking him in even when Laura would rather have him burn in Hell, but Henry’s brother Jamie (Garrett Hedlund) manages to escape long enough to have an unexpected change of heart as far as Black people are concerned. Unfortunately for Jamie, his escape was World War II.

Florence’s son, Ronsel (Jason Mitchell) also served in World War II, battling the Germans and becoming the lover of a German woman he met overseas. He returns to a country that not only refuses to thank him for his service, but also expects him to return to second-class citizenry once he’s back on U.S. soil. The fact that Ronsel is treated better in the enemy country than his own is not lost on us. It will be underlined twice in the film’s bittersweet ending. Ronsel’s scenes with the White townsfolk upon his return are an unsubtle reminder that the America we’re seeing in this film is the one that certain voters want to bring back into existence.

Jamie and Ronsel bond over their shared war experiences, though initially, Ronsel is skeptical and worried about Jamie’s intentions. Jamie tells him that a Tuskegee Airman saved his ass in a dogfight, and that changed his perspective on race. Their friendship is anchored by war stories and booze, of which Jamie drinks too much to drown out symptoms of his PTSD. Nobody understands this the way Ronsel does, but their relationship immediately casts a sense of dread over the film. This progressive partnership is a dangerous one, because Jamie’s a loose cannon and Ronsel is unwilling to go back to racist rules now that he’s had a taste of freedom. So when “Mudbound” becomes terrifyingly violent, we have been prepped for it. Rees handles this, and the subsequent vengeance that follows, with amazing restraint, keeping it from becoming exploitative without diminishing any of its shock value.

Though “Mudbound” presents most of its story and its characters in parallels of two, Ronsel is the one character who shares traits with other characters. Like Florence, he has both a charitable and a stubborn streak, which is evidenced in a wonderful scene where he buys her a bar of chocolate. When Florence intends to break it into pieces and give it to her other kids, Ronsel demands that she keep the entire thing for herself. Have a taste of your own freedom, just as I had for myself in the service, he seems to say to her. It’s a well-played small moment in a movie filled with them.

While the entire cast is superb, “Mudbound” belongs to Blige, Mitchell and Hedlund. Hedlund’s roguish performance is a loose, sexy throwback to Errol Flynn and James Dean—he would have been right at home in front of George Stevens’ camera or underscored by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Blige is a revelation. And Mitchell deservingly earns the film’s last internal monologue, a quiet, bittersweet and moving meditation on choosing love over hate that proves that Ronsel is the film’s true hero.

I do know that it supports his thesis that movies are machines that generate empathy. I believe that viewers of different races will find different entry points into the film, but everyone will come out at the end with their viewpoints challenged and perhaps enriched. Rees and company have crafted an unforgettable plea for empathy and justice. This is not an easy film, but it’s an essential one. 

FINAL RATING: 10/10 FOR THE GENRE & 9/10 OVERALL. Masterful drama set in 1940s South has brutality, racism.


Thanks for reading and have fun watching movies.

[IN CINEMAS DECEMBER 1] AMITYVILLE: THE AWAKENING (2017) - REVIEW + HD TRAILER

Amityville: The Awakening (2017)

PG-13 | | Horror, Thriller | 12 October 2017 (USA) 

A desperate single mother moves with her three children into the notorious, supposedly haunted, real-life Amityville house to try and use its dark powers to cure her comatose son. Things go horribly wrong.

Director:

Writer:

(screenplay)

Stars:


Belle, her little sister, and her comatose twin brother move into a new house with their single mother Joan in order to save money to help pay for her brother's expensive healthcare. But when strange phenomena begin to occur in the house including the miraculous recovery of her brother, Belle begins to suspect her Mother isn't telling her everything and soon realizes they just moved into the infamous Amityville house.  


Country:

Language:

Release Date:

12 October 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Amityville Horror: The Lost Tapes  »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

The film's tongue-in-cheek advertising campaign features posters which are made up to resemble the social media site, Instagram, with the main character depicted using the site and posting a photo of the infamous Amityville house with the caption: "Moving in today #NewBeginnings". See more »

Goofs

This movie was set in 2014, but Belle's username in the movie poster in Instagram-style says she is '99. However, in the movie it's mentioned she's 17 which would mean she was born in '97. See more »

Connections

References The Amityville Horror (1979) See more »

Soundtracks

When The Sun Came Down
Written by Mathieu Carratier & Greg Taieb
Performed by 'Artificial Darkness'
Courtesy of 'Mathieu Carratier' & 'Gregory J. Taieb' 
 
Franck Khalfoun's Amityville: The Awakening is, according to the press materials, the 10th canonical film in a long-running central Amityville series, a franchise of films that has wended its way calmly and unobtrusively through the history of horror movies without much notice. While the 1979 film The Amityville Horror, based on Jay Anson's notorious “true story” of a real-life haunting in the titular New York town, is considered to be something of a minor horror classic, few of the film's many sequels, reboots, and spinoffs have left much impression in people's minds (Amityville II: The Possession being, perhaps, the one exception, if only for its incestuous underpinnings).
Amityville: The Awakening, while largely a generic haunting film without much in the way of a hook beyond its famous setting, can at least claim to be one of the more watchable Amityville films, for whatever that praise may be worth. Awakening boasts decent production values, a notable cast that includes Jennifer Jason Leigh and Kurtwood Smith, and a few fleeting moments of palpable, spooky atmosphere. And while Awakening never manages to move the needle anywhere past the most basic baseline reading, it is perhaps the best Amityville film since 1983.

Awakening stars Bella Thorne as Belle, a stereotypical broody Goth teen whose doting mother (Leigh) has moved her, her younger sister (Mckenna Grace), and her comatose twin brother James (Cameron Monaghan) into the infamous 112 Ocean Ave. house in the hopes that the new setting will revive her son. James, a frightening, skeletal figure, is a dark specter that hangs over the family. Mom believes he can still recover, but his sisters have largely accepted that James left them long ago. It's during the heady and serious conversations about James that Awakening threatens to break into something salient and poignant.

Belle, perhaps naturally, doesn't know about the dark history of the house until an enthused classmate (Thomas Mann) shows her a DVD of the 1979 feature film and a copy of Anson's book. That the 1979 film exists as a film within its own continuity is a little dizzying, but a wise horror fan knows to ignore such trifling double-backs. As if on cue, Belle begins seeing shadowy figures lurking in the hallways at night, and James begins showing signs of recovery... or possession.
There are the makings of a very good family drama hidden within Awakening, and director Khalfoun (Maniac, P2) manages to squeeze a notable – if not enormous – amount of tactile suffering out of his trim screenplay. The film, however, swiftly jettisons its maturity, preferring to become a usual collection of usual jump scares, usual banging noises, and usual shots of usual pajama-clad teens wandering slowly down usual darkened passageways to investigate usual spooky noises. The scares are handled with competence, but horror fans deserve more than mere competence.

Amityville: The Awakening was completed in 2014, but was shelved for three years due to various distribution problems. It is now finally been made available for free on Google Play in advance of a proper theatrical release on October 28th. (It will also be available on Blu-ray and DVD on November 14.) Incidentally, in the three years it took this film to be released, about five or six other Amityville films made their way to the public.

FINAL RATING: 5/10 FOR THE GENRE & 3/10 OVERALL. It has a good cast, and, if viewed by a group of rowdy friends late at night, may certainly do its due diligence in periodically startling you for 87 minutes, but never manages to transcend its genre in any meaningful way.

 
Thanks for reading and have fun watching movies.

[IN CINEMAS NOVEMBER 17] JUSTIC LEAGUE (2017) [ACTION/FANTASY] - REVIEW + HD TRAILER

Justice League (2017)



Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman's selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince, to face an even greater enemy.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay by), (screenplay by) | 7 more credits »

Stars:


Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman's selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists the help of his newfound ally, Diana Prince, to face an even greater enemy. Together, Batman and Wonder Woman work quickly to find and recruit a team of metahumans to stand against this newly awakened threat. But despite the formation of this unprecedented league of heroes-Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash-it may already be too late to save the planet from an assault of catastrophic proportions.  


Official Sites:

|

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 November 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Justice League  »

Box Office

Budget:

$300,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

Michael McElhatton and Ciarán Hinds have both starred in Game of Thrones (2011) and films about the King Arthur legend: Ciaran Hinds in Excalibur (1981) and Michael McElhatton in King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2017). See more »

Quotes

Bruce Wayne: [from trailer] I'm putting together a team of people with special abilities. See, I believe enemies are coming...
Barry Allen: Stop right there. I'm in.
Bruce Wayne: You are? Just like that?
Barry Allen: Yeah, I... I need... friends.
Bruce Wayne: Agreed.
Barry Allen: [holds up batarang] Can I keep this?
See more »

Connections

 
 
 
For a film about a band of heroes trying to stop extraterrestrial demon-beasts from wiping out humanity, "Justice League" is light on its feet, sprinting through a super-group's origin story in less than two hours, giving its ensemble lots to do, and mostly avoiding the self-importance that damaged previous entries in this franchise. (Aside from Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy, "Logan," and a handful of other dark superhero films, excessive moping and brooding tends to be these projects’ undoing.) It’s unfortunate that the film was released on the heels of "Thor: Ragnarok," another knockabout superhero adventure, because critically it will suffer in comparison, even though it chooses a different route toward a similar destination, overcoming daunting production hurdles in the process.

“Justice League” never matches the latter film in visual invention, though, and it has basic script problems that never get solved. One is figuring out how to balance the screen time of known quantities from previous entries, such as Batman (Ben Affleck), Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot), Lois Lane (Amy Adams) and Superman (not a spoiler; Henry Cavill’s name is on the poster, folks), against another standard-issue, roaring-and-stomping bad guy (Ciaran Hinds’ Steppenwolf, leader of the Parademons) and three major new characters: The Flash (Ezra Miller), Aquaman (Jason Momoa), and Cyborg (Ray Fisher). The plotline that brings the heroes together is the impending invasion of earth by Steppenwolf, who wants to recover and merge three magic boxes that will give him ultimate power and terraform the planet and blah-de-blah, who cares, seriously, it doesn’t matter.

All that being said, this is an ensemble adventure that’s nearly as satisfying (and humble in its aims) as the “Avengers” movies. Like the recent “Thor,” it seems to have figured out that a mega-budgeted superhero picture can be serious without carrying on as if humor, sentiment, and even color are inherently childish. “Justice League” splits the difference between Snyder’s kinetic, cruelly funny “Dawn of the Dead” remake and “Sucker Punch” and his more dour, depressive epics like “300,” “Man of Steel” and “BvS.” It’s the kind of movie where The Flash can serve as wide-eyed, often bumbling comic relief, much as Spider-Man did in the second half of “Captain America: Civil War,” and Batman can bust Aquaman’s chops for bringing a “pitchfork” (actually a trident) to a battle. But it’s also the kind of film where every member of the Justice League—plus Lois Lane and Diane Lane's Martha Kent—can have a heartfelt “spotlight” moment in which they admit withdrawing from life or putting up a tough façade to cushion the pain of loss, and rest assured that the other characters, and the film itself, will take their anguish seriously. (There are hints that Steppenwolf is working through a version of this problem: part of his grudge against Earth comes from being publicly humiliated eons ago.)

The scenes of Lois and Clark’s reconciliation are brief but sensitively rendered. Almost as moving is the newfound reasonableness of Batman, a miserable loner who seems to have been shocked into sensitivity (at least as much sensitivity as Bruce Wayne is capable of) by the death of Superman, an event for which he assumes primary responsibility. There are moments where you wonder if he's trying to build a team not just to save the planet but to give himself a circle of friends and a reason to check in with them every day. The greying, thickening Affleck is endearing here because he leans into his age, playing up the character's more grievous injuries and making light of the fact that he's not the Bat he used to be.

The movie starts by hauling out clichéd elements, including a bleached-out color palette, a funeral in pouring rain, and a mopey, piano-driven version of a dark pop anthem (in this case, Sigrid's cover of Leonard Cohen's "Everybody Knows"). But the BummerVision filmmaking proves to be an aesthetic setup for a worthy payoff: "Justice League" adds wit, invention, color and warmth as it goes along, a strategy befitting a story about characters (and a world) waking up from emotional sleep and learning to take risks and care again. The movie wears its big themes on its sleeves, or breastplates, expressing them via on-the-nose dialogue and brazenly metaphorical images, like the climactic shots of flowers blooming in vivid color and a stirring image of two Amazon warriors, representatives of a society that bears an unimaginable burden, bracing their shoulders against a closing stone door like sisters of Atlas. But that’s what films like this do, just as Westerns and zombie movies and other genre films did before them. “Justice League” is an honorable example of how to work in that mode with skill and a poker face. 

The inevitable return of Superman is powerful partly because Snyder and company established that his death plunged the world into a haze of despair, superstition, reactionary politics, and revolutionary-flavored violent crime. If the big blue marvel is, as “Batman v. Superman” suggested, something like a god, that means God is temporarily dead when our story begins (his allure smashed into pieces like that giant statue of Kal-El), and therefore can’t watch over us. God's absence means the weaker, meaner, more opportunistic mortals and immortals feel emboldened to do their worst. These aspects of the film are so intriguing that one wishes that they’d been more fully developed, along with the allusions to rising religious fundamentalism and the straightforward equating of Steppenwolf to Satan, a creature of raw chaos and viciousness stepping into a power vacuum. (“Praise to the mother of horrors!” he roars.) But if the film is  a potluck stew of half-cooked notions, it's at least a tasty one.

Although Ezra Miller’s Jeff Goldblum-like incarnation of the Flash is the most shameless crowd-pleaser, Wonder Woman hooks the film into a belt loop and walks away with it. “Justice League” mishandles the Amazons to give the movie an early jolt of high stakes drama, teases the idea that Batman and Wonder Woman will become a couple (but thankfully doesn’t pursue it), and lets Wonder Woman become an unofficial mommy to the rest of the Justice League, armored men whose competitiveness and wiseguy insults make them seem like overgrown boys, but her character isn't purely reactive, and the filmmakers don't sell her out. Wonder Woman's decency, compassion and moral certitude deliver the same electric charge here that earlier generations got from watching Christopher Reeve play Superman/Clark Kent. Her goodness isn't an act. It's who she is.
 
It’s frustrating to see "Justice League" fail to get out of its own way, because whenever it does, it shrugs off the burdens of its famously troubled production and becomes special. An exact accounting of what went wrong is a matter for an investigative reporter, not a film reviewer, but one would assume that the filmmaking process wasn’t helped by the studio’s sudden, post-“Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice” demand that the story add humor and camaraderie. Ditto the March, 2017 death of director Zack Snyder’s daughter, which put Joss Whedon, who’d already been hired for rewrites, in charge of post-production (including the CGI erasure of a mustache that Cavill grew after he thought the shoot had wrapped—a dubious technical triumph that results in some weird-looking close-ups). The extent of Whedon’s involvement in this rescue operation is anybody's guess. Regardless, the end product is coherent: funny but rarely glib, serious but unpretentious, and better than it had any right to be.   

FINAL RATING: 8/10 FOR THE GENRE & 8/10 OVERALL. Average but not super good. All-star superhero adventure is uneven but entertaining.


Thanks for reading and have fun watching Justice League, in cinemas this Friday.

[IN CINEMAS DEC 15] STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI (2017) - HD TRAILER

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017)




TRAILER




Coming Soon

In theaters December 15. 


Having taken her first steps into the larger Jedi world, Rey joins Luke Skywalker on an adventure with Leia, Finn and Poe that unlocks mysteries of the Force and secrets of the past.

Director:

Writers:

, (based on characters created by)

Stars:


1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »  
 
 Having taken her first steps into the larger Jedi world, Rey joins Luke Skywalker on an adventure with Leia, Finn and Poe that unlocks mysteries of the Force and secrets of the past. 
 

Official Sites:

|

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

15 December 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ratovi Zvezde: Epizoda 8 - Poslednji Džedaj  »

Company Credits


Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

Luke Skywalker bears a strong resemblance to Obi Wan Kenobi in the original trilogy from his whitening hair to his beard. In fact Mark Hamill reappraised his role in 2015 aged 64 while Alec Guinness was 63 when he was first cast as Obi Wan Kenobi. See more »

Quotes

Supreme Leader Snoke: Fulfill your destiny!

Connections

Featured in Blackcatloner: The Last Jedi Wears a Cat Mask! (2017)
 
Thanks for reading and have fun watching the movie, in on Dec 15.
 
Copyright © 2017. MOVIETOWN
Blogger Templates