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TOP UPCOMING ANIMATED MOVIES 2018 Trailers

Here are the top upcoming animated Movies for the first half of 2018  
00:03 Hotel Transylvania 3  
01:35 The Incredibles 2  
02:26 Peter Rabbit 
04:40 Isle Of Dogs 
07:14 Early Man 
09:28 Sherlock Gnomes 
11:43 Duck Duck Goose

 
 

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TOP UPCOMING SCIENCE FICTION MOVIES 2018 Trailers

Here are our top upcoming science fiction movies of 2018: 
00:03 Jurassic World 
02:26 Rampage  
04:51 Ready Player One  
07:15 Alita Battle Angel  
09:01 Annihilation 
10:41 Deadpool 2  
10:54 Avengers Infinity War  
13:18 Black Panther  
15:35 Pacific Rim 2  
17:53 Maze Runner 3


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[IN CINEMAS 12/15/2017] STAR WARS - THE LAST JEDI (2017) EXTENDED REVIEW [NO SPOIL] + HD TRAILER

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017)



Having taken her first steps into the Jedi world, Rey joins Luke Skywalker on an adventure with Leia, Finn and Poe that unlocks mysteries of the Force and secrets of the past.

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, (based on characters created by)

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Storyline

Having taken her first steps into the Jedi world, Rey joins Luke Skywalker on an adventure with Leia, Finn and Poe that unlocks mysteries of the Force and secrets of the past.



Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sequences of sci-fi action and violence. | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »

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Official Sites:

|

Country:

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Release Date:

15 December 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ratovi Zvezde: Epizoda 8 - Poslednji Džedaj  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the original trilogy, Mark Hamill received top billing in all three films. In "Star Wars: The Force Awakens", Harrison Ford had received top billing while Hamill was second to be billed. Hamill will receive top billing once more in "Star Wars: The Last Jedi." See more »

Goofs

When the hospital ship runs out of propellant, it gets slower and starts tilting to the back without any apparent outside influence. This would not happen to any object in space that simply stops being propelled - it would continue on its exact trajectory until stopped by reverse thrust our outside force. See more »

Quotes

Luke Skywalker: This is not going to go the way you think!
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Connections

 
Writer/director Rian Johnson’s “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” is a sprawling, incident- and character-packed extravaganza that picks up at the end of “Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens” and guides the series into unfamiliar territory. It’s everything a fan could want from a “Star Wars” film and then some. Even the sorts of viewers who spend the entire running time of movies anticipating every plot twist and crowing “called it!” when they get one right are likely to come up short here. But the surprises usually don’t violate the (admittedly loose) internal logic of the universe George Lucas invented, and when they seem to, it’s because the movie has expanded the mythology in a small but significant way, or imported a sliver of something from another variant of Lucas’ creation (Genddy Tartakovsky’s magnificent TV series “Clone Wars” seems to have influenced the last act).  
The first part of “The Last Jedi” cross-cuts between the remnants of our heroes’ ragtag fleet (led by the late Carrie Fisher’s Leia) running away from the First Order, aka the next-generation version of the Empire; and Rey (Daisy Ridley) on the aquatic planet Ahch-To (gesundheit!) trying to convince the self-exiled Jedi master Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill, whose sandblasted face becomes truly iconic in close-ups) to overcome his grief at failing a group of young Jedi trainees and rejoin the Resistance. The New Order's Supreme Leader Snoke (Andy Serkis plus CGI) has grand plans for both Rey and his Darth Vader-obsessed apprentice Kylo Ren (Adam Driver). The leathery old coot may not be a great bad guy—he’s too much of a standard-issue deep-voiced sadist, in a Marvel mode—but he is quite the chess player, and so is Johnson.  

I’m being vague here on purpose. Suffice to say that, despite being comprised of variations on things we’ve been experiencing directly (in “Star Wars” films) and indirectly (in “Star Wars”-inspired entertainment) since 1977, “The Last Jedi” still manages to maneuver in unexpected ways, starting with the decision to build a whole film around a retreat where the goal is not to win but to avoid being wiped out. Along that narrative backbone “The Last Jedi” strings what amount to several tight, often hastily devised mini-missions, each of which either moves the heroes (or villains) closer to their goals or blows up in their faces. The story resolves in lengthy, consecutive climaxes which, refreshingly, don’t play like a cynical attempt to pad things out. Old business is resolved, new business introduced.

And from scene to scene, Johnson gives veteran characters (Chewbacca and R2-D2 especially) and those who debuted in “The Force Awakens” enough screen time to showcase them at their best while also introducing compelling new faces (including a heroic maintenance worker, Kelly Marie Tran’s Rose Tico; a serene and tough vice admiral in the Resistance, played by Laura Dern; a sort of “safecracker” character played by Benicio Del Toro). 

Johnson’s script does a better job than most sequels of giving the audience both what it wants and what it didn’t know it wanted. The movie leans hard into sentiment, most of it planted in the previous installment, some related to the unexpected passing of one of its leads (Fisher—thank goodness they gave her a lot of screen time here, and thrilling things to do). But whenever it allows a character to cry (or invites us to) the catharsis feels earned. It happens rather often—this being a film preoccupied with grieving for the past and transcending it, populated by hounded and broken people who are afraid hope will be snuffed out. 

Rey’s anguish at not knowing who her parents are and Kylo Ren’s trauma at killing his own father to advance toward his "destiny" literally as well as figuratively mirror each other. Lifting a bit of business glimpsed briefly in “The Empire Strikes Back” and "Return of the Jedi," Johnson lets these all-powerful characters telepathically “speak” to each other across space as easily as you or I might Skype with a friend. This gimmick offers so much potential for drama and wry humor that you might wonder why nobody did it earlier. 

Sometimes "The Last Jedi" violates our expectations in a cheeky way that stops short of telling super-fans to get over themselves. There’s a touch of “Spaceballs” and “Robot Chicken” to some of the jokes. Snoke orders Kylo to “take off that ridiculous helmet,” Luke chastises an old friend for showing a nostalgic video by muttering “That was a cheap move,” and an early gag finds one of the heroes calling the bridge of a star destroyer and pretending to be stuck on hold. This aspect adds a much-needed dash of self-deprecating humor (“The Force Awakens” was often a stitch as well, especially when Han Solo, Chewbacca, BB-8 and John Boyega’s James Garner-like hero/coward Finn were onscreen), but without going so meta that "The Last Jedi" turns into a smart-alecky thesis paper on itself.

The movie works equally well as an earnest adventure full of passionate heroes and villains and a meditation on sequels and franchise properties. Like “The Force Awakens,” only more so, this one is preoccupied with questions of legacy, legitimacy and succession, and includes multiple debates over whether one should replicate or reject the stories and symbols of the past. Among its many valuable lessons is that objects have no worth save for the feelings we invest in them, and that no individual is greater than a noble idea.

Johnson has made some very good theatrical features, but the storytelling here owes the most to his work on TV’s “Breaking Bad,” a playfully convoluted crime drama that approached each new installment like a street illusionist: no matter where you decided to fix your eyes, the source of delight was always in the hand you weren’t looking at. There are points where the film appears to have miscalculated or made an outright lame choice (this become worrisome in the middle, when Dern’s Admiral Holdo and Oscar Isaac’s hotshot pilot Poe Dameron are at loggerheads), but then you realize that it was a setup for another payoff that lands harder because you briefly doubted that “The Last Jedi” does, in fact, know what it’s doing.  

This determination to split the difference between surprise and inevitability is encoded in “The Last Jedi” down to the level of scenes and shots. How many Star Destroyers, TIE fighters, Imperial walkers, lightsabers, escape pods, and discussions of the nature of The Force have we seen by now? Oodles. But Johnson manages to find a way to present the technology, mythology and imagery in a way that makes it feel new, or at least new-ish, starting with a shot of Star Destroyers materializing from hyperspace in the sky over a planet (as seen from ground level) and continuing through images of Rebel ships being raked apart by Imperial cannon fire like cans on a shooting range and, hilariously, a blurry video conference in which the goggle-eyed warrior-philosopher Maz Kanata (voiced by Lupita Nyong'o) delivers important information while engaging in a shootout with unseen foes. (She calls it a “union matter.”) 

There’s greater attention paid here to color and composition than in any entry since “The Empire Strikes Back.” Particularly dazzling are Snoke’s throne room, with its Dario Argento-red walls and red-armored guards, and the final battle, set on a salt planet whose flat white surfaces get ripped up to reveal shades of crimson. (Seen from a distance, the battlefield itself seems to be bleeding.) The architecture of the action sequences is something to behold. A self-enclosed setpiece in the opening space battle is more emotionally powerful than any action sequence in any blockbuster this year, save the "No Man's Land" sequence of "Wonder Woman," and it's centered on a character we just met.  
There are spots where the film can’t figure out how to get the characters to where it needs them to be and just sort of shrugs and says, “And then this happened, now let’s get on with it.” But there are fewer such moments than you might have gone in prepared to forgive—and really, if that sort of thing were a cinematic crime, Howard Hawks would have gotten the chair. Most importantly, the damned thing moves, both in a plot sense and in the sense of a skilled choreographer-dancer who has visualized every millisecond of his routine and practiced it to the point where grace seems to come as easily as breathing. Or skywalking.

FINAL RATING: 9/10 FOR THE GENRE AND 8/10 OVERALL. THE MOVIE IS STILL A GOOD ONE AND FANS LIKE I AM WILL LOVE IT AND WATCH IT SEVERAL TIMES BUT IT TRULY HAS IT'S WEAKNESSES AS POINTED OUT WHICH I DID NOT EXPECT.


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JURASSIC WORLD FALLEN KINGDOM FIRST LOOK MAKING OFF AND TRAILER

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)



Plot unknown.

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Release Date:

22 June 2018 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jurassic Park 5  »

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Color:

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2.39 : 1

Did You Know?

Trivia

Nina Gold is the casting director for this sequel. Filming will take place in the United Kingdom and Hawaii. 

Connections

Follows Jurassic Park (1993) See more » 
 
Be ready for next weeks Jurassic Park and Jurassic World week.
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[IN CINEMAS 12/1/2017] THE DANCER - REVIEW

The Dancer (2016)

La danseuse (original title)

Loïe Fuller was the toast of the Folies Bergères at the turn of the 20th century and an inspiration for Toulouse-Lautrec and the Lumière Brothers. The film revolves around her complicated relationship with protégé and rival Isadora Duncan.

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(collaboration), (novel) | 6 more credits »

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Storyline

There was nothing in her background to prepare Loïe to become the toast of the Folies Bergères in Paris and stages across the world. Then she created the 'Serpentine Dance'... 1887. After the death of her gold prospector father, 25-year-old Marie-Louise leaves her life in the American West to join her mother in New York and pursue her heart's dream - becoming an actress. One night on stage, becoming tangled in her long dress, she avoids falling by spinning the fabric in a graceful, magical gesture: the "Serpentine Dance" is born. The audience - shocked, then overwhelmed - calls out for more. Marie-Louise has become Loïe Fuller. She embarks on a new, hectic life, leaving New York, where imitators try to steal her radical innovations, for Paris. At the Folies Bergères, she dazzles the capital, and illustrious admirers fall at her feet. Toulouse Lautrec, the Lumière Brothers, Rodin... the Electric Fairy becomes an icon, the blazing symbol of a generation. But fame isn't all. An encounter... 



Certificate:

See all certifications »

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Language:

|

Release Date:

1 December 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Dancer  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

€25,502 (Italy) (18 June 2017)
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2.39 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

French visa # 142.843. See more »

Goofs

Loie first performed at the Follies Bergere in the early 1890s, but the director of the Follies Bergere is driving an "olde tymey" car from perhaps 2 decades later when Loie ambushes him in his carpark in order to present an impromptu audition. See more »

Soundtracks

The Four Seasons
Composed by Antonio Vivaldi
Performed by Max Richter
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When it comes to pioneers of modern choreography, most are familiar with Isadora Duncan. The American-born dancer, who embodied Greek ideals and a bohemian lifestyle, was memorably portrayed by an Oscar-nominated Vanessa Redgrave in the 1968 biopic, “Isadora.” She would die in 1927 after one of her signature scarves caught in the wheel spokes of an open-air car and caused her to be ejected. That tragic variation of being hung by one’s own petard helped to solidify her status as a terpsichorean legend.

But the name Loie Fuller, the subject of “The Dancer” who was an early supporter of Duncan, did not ring a bell—at least, for me. Born Mary-Louise in 1862, she was a Chicago-area native and innovator of a brand of free-form performance art known as Serpentine Dance. Her act consisted of a costume designed from massive swatches of silk attached to long bamboo rods being whirled and twirled while Fuller circled about on an elevated stage. She also invented multi-hued dramatic lighting techniques, many now commonplace, to enhance the undulations of her voluminous fabric.

However, after checking out the famous Art Nouveau posters by Jules Cheret that stylized Fuller’s allure and then realizing that the silent-era filmmakers the Lumiere brothers had featured Fuller copycats in their work, I discovered I did know of the existence of the so-called “La Danseuse de la Belle Epoque.”

This unique artist, who packs plenty of opportunities for visual pizzazz, seems long overdue for big-screen treatment. And given that Fuller outwardly was more of a muscular tomboy than ethereal waif,  first-time director Stephanie Di Giusto at least has gone outside the box when casting her lead. Her choice? A French singer-songwriter turned actress known as Soko, whose bobbed brunette hair and distinctly off-beat features suggest a not-unappealing blend of Erin Moran of “Happy Days” fame and Bjork.

But despite an on-screen claim that her movie is based on a true story, Di Giusto’s script plays fast and loose with many of the facts of Fuller’s history—none more so than the Old West prologue with her gold-prospecting father that involves both cattle rustling and recited excerpts of Oscar Wilde’s play “Salome.” When Dad is shot dead in an outdoor bathtub, Fuller high-tails it to Brooklyn and takes up residence with her Temperance-warrior mother (a wasted Amanda Plummer). That is when she decides to try stage acting. When her too-large costume begins to droop mid-scene, Fuller simply lifts her skirt and spins around. The audience approves, and suddenly a dance sensation is created and Loie is born.

Soon she will seek her fortune in Paris and become a sensation at the Folies-Bergere. But not before she meets her prime benefactor and semi-consort, the vampire-like composite character of Count Louis Dorsay (Gaspard Ulliel), who likes his rooms dark as tombs, his sexual partners for hire and his mood-altering ether readily available. Most of Ulliel and Soko’s scenes together tend to devolve into silent staring contests, including those at his mansion in the City of Lights. The property serves as both Fuller’s new home and her rehearsal space where she trains a chorus line of tunic-garbed young followers.

This is where the youthful Duncan comes in as Fuller’s seductive new student, slinky and sylph-like, whose style is more formal than intuitive. Before you can say “All About Eve,” Duncan—embodied by a teenage Lily-Rose Depp (the minx-like spawn of Johnny Depp and his ex, Vanessa Paradis)—is bewitching her mentor and soon-to-be rival out of her clothes in a garden at dusk before leaving her high and dry in more ways than one.

“The Dancer” clearly needed a better task master behind the camera. There are too many scenes of Fuller physically and mentally suffering for her art as she questions if what she does actually qualifies as dance. How many times do we need to see her soak her body in a vat of ice? Depp’s lone dancing interlude is achieved primarily by an obvious body double although her seduction of Soko is effective if brief. And, overall, the editing feels weighed down rather than spritely, as one would hope for a film about freedom of movement. Too many episodes either go on too long or are too short—as is the case with Fuller’s climatic and triumphant debut at the Opera House.
If there is joy to be found in this story, it comes from Soko’s sincere commitment, the staging of her re-creations of Fuller's astonishing routines and the subtle facial nuances of Melanie Thierry as Gabrielle, her ever-alert loyal assistant and protector. But if a biopic about a dancer causes you to search the Internet to better learn more details about its subject while yearning for more musical numbers, that can’t be a good sign.

What is most damning is that Fuller was anything but a brooding loner, as she too often comes off as in the movie. Before dying from pneumonia in 1928, she would influence such artists and writers as Rodin, Toulouse-Lautrec and Yeats. She inspired both Ruth St. Denis and Martha Graham. You can even sense her impact on contemporary routines featured on the TV competition show, “So You Think You Can Dance.” She was given patents for her staging and lighting innovations, developed cinematic techniques and grew close to Marie Curie and her family. If only Di Giusto more ambitiously broadened her scope, she would have made a fleet-footed tribute for the ages instead of stumbling over such rich possibilities. 

FINAL RATING: 7/10 FOR THE GENRE AND 6/10 OVERALL. A really nice movie about a dancer with certain dreams but still some more aspects were left out, which would have made it a better one.


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[IN CINEMAS 12/1/2017] THE SWINDLERS - REVIEW

The Swindlers (2017)

Kkun (original title)

High stakes and fast talk are the game in this crime caper that brings together an all-star cast as unlikely allies from different sides of the law. Each member of the team has their own ... See full summary »

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High stakes and fast talk are the game in this crime caper that brings together an all-star cast as unlikely allies from different sides of the law. Each member of the team has their own motives, but they'll have to work together to achieve their common goal-trapping the world's most legendary con man. Written by Well GO USA Entertainment

Genres:

Crime

Certificate:

See all certifications »

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Release Date:

1 December 2017 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ggoon  »

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 »
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One can't help but wonder just how much of the charm of the Korean con man thriller "The Swindlers" wore off in translation. I readily admit that, as someone unfamiliar with the Korean language (beyond a couple of key phrases), the appeal of the film's more dialogue-intensive scenes were probably lost on me thanks to English subtitles that were often distractingly blocky. 
Then again, much of this thriller's unbelievably formulaic plot—a group of con men go on a quest to hustle a Bernie Madoff-style scam artist—is already flat-footed. Sure, overly literal translations of colloquialisms, like "swindlers," are one thing. But there are also, generally speaking, too many scenes that are so contrived that I sometimes wondered if a living script template for an "Ocean's Eleven"-style heist movie had come to life, and left no cliche behind in its hapless quest to deliver superficially topical thrills. There's a small chance that the subtitles of this film simply aren't apparent because of an insurmountable cultural barrier. But it's more likely that "The Swindlers" was always DOA.

Take for example the laborious half-hour set-up that quickly, and unconvincingly establishes big fish antagonist Joo-chil Jang (Sung-tae Heo) as a heartless criminal who, according to a news reporter, is responsible for "the biggest Ponzi scheme in history," and the suicides of several financially destitute victims. Everybody wants a piece of Jang, including square-jawed lawyer Heeo-soo Park (Ji-tae Yoo), sexy lady pickpocket Choon-ja (Nana), and cocky young con man Ji-sung Hwang (Bin Hyun). So, a super-coalition of pretty-looking thieves, almost all played by popular Korean actors, forms with the express purpose of taking down Jang.  

Unfortunately, there's not much to Hwang's maverick leadership skills, nor his colleagues pseudo-twisty attempts at disarming Jang's many go-betweens, and colleagues. Every major story, and stylistic beat in "The Swindlers" was borrowed from better films, especially Steven Soderbergh's "Ocean's Eleven" trilogy. Well-dressed characters watch gigantic TVs, and monitor each other's progress through seemingly omnipresent closed-security televisions. They record phone calls and in-office negotiations, hoping to stumble upon incriminating evidence they can use for the next part of their elaborate confidence tricks. 

They also frequently exclaim key plot points as if they were characters in a really bad "Dick Tracy" cartoon, like when multiple protagonists address Hwang's father Yoo-suk (Jin-young Jung) by his con-man nick-name of "London Fog." Lines like "Good old London Fog," and "What are you thinking, London Fog" isn't just tin-eared: it's embarrassingly corny. Then again, the real nadir of this method of intelligence-degrading expository dialogue comes during Hwang's first scene, when one of Park's men identifies Hwang by exclaiming "That's the guy who only cons the swindlers!" I'm sure this line sounds relatively better in the original Korean. But this already tacky line is especially abysmal when nothing else in "The Swindlers" seems to come together. 

Then again, lame dialogue would be bearable if the film's cast were more than just generally adequate. Sadly, these actors frequently over-play their characters' hands so that we always know when Park's crew are performing. They also usually lack chemistry, which sinks any scene where Nana has to seduce already wary subjects. Nana plays a naive babe in the woods well enough, but her mannerisms are expressed mostly through tics, like pouting, eyelash-batting, and crying. There's never a moment where you can see in her what her interchangeable targets should be drooling over. It's bad enough that Nana is stuck with pseudo-flirty baby talk like "Don't I look like a girl to you?" What's worse is that Nana doesn't even nail a physical-comedy-centric scene like the one where she plays drunk, and tries to convince one of Jang's intermediaries to lower his guard. If I were in this guy's position, I would sprint away as fast as I could. 

It's especially unfortunate that "The Swindlers" is exclusively populated by characters and performers who appear to always be acting since the movie's central theme is, as (sigh) Night Fog explains the notion that "doubts" are all a good con artist needs to persuade a mark since "Doubts become assurances once they're dispelled." Again, a klutzy line of dialogue, but one that could have revealed something about the psychology of scammers, and their victims. No such insight can be found here though since every potential source for good popcorn entertainment is thrice warmed-over, and poorly executed. You may think that you, the viewer, have it bad by the sixty minute mark, at which point you probably won't care who is inevitably going to backstab who. But just think of the poor subtitle translator who had to agonize over dialogue so leaden that it took the joy out of a word that's as joyfully outdated as "swindler." To that unsung translator: you deserve a substantial raise, a major award, and a stiff drink.

FINAL RATING: 2/10 FOR THE GENRE AND 2/10 OVERALL. No even worth to think about it afterwards.


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[IN CINEMAS 12/1/2017] PSYCHPATHS - REVIEW

Psychopaths (2017)



Several psychopaths wreak havoc over the course of a violent night.

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Storyline

Several psychopaths wreak havoc over the course of a violent night.

Genres:

Horror

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Release Date:

1 December 2017 (USA)  »

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When Steven Soderbergh announced he was retiring from cinema, he lamented about watching a fellow passenger on an airplane watch only the action scenes in a list of loud movies, skipping the dialogue and  stories. The director called this “mayhem porn,” a designation and ideology fitting for the latest from indie director Mickey Keating, “Psychopaths." The film is an active, obnoxious test of an audience’s appetite for blood and how long they can go without novel ideas like purpose or plot. 

In the history of lazy conceits for mass violence, “Psychopaths” proudly throws itself towards the bottom. A serial killer (played by horror icon Larry Fessenden, who also executive produced) has just been executed, and the evil within his soul has spread throughout Los Angeles. Not in any direct visual way, but enough so that this script can focus on violence as a type of trending topic for the night. 

"The Purge" films, of which “Psychopaths” will owe many of its viewers, nudge that violence is an epidemic that we choose to embrace. But any idea of treating "Psychopaths" as a type of commentary on how violence is a force beyond consciousness is muffled early, as violence becomes an action to create whatever “Psychopaths” thinks looks cool. Overhead shots of torture weapons, shadowy long takes of people being shot in darkness—it’s all just about killing people for the sake of killing people. Ho hum. 

A plot does not materialize so much as characters of questionable backgrounds and expansive capacities for violence. In an elegantly composed one-shot, a man is introduced attacking a woman, strangling her, and killing someone that comes to the rescue. Played by James Landry Hebert and a distinct mustache, he’s known as The Strangler, naturally. But the night has other things in store for him when he meets Blondie (Angela Trimbur), a killer of her own right, with her own stone face and campy desire to torture. 

Evil lurks elsewhere in the valley, like in the soul of a singer named Alice (Ashley Bell, a Keating MVP), who is introduced with a brightly-lit stage performance of “Let Me Call You Sweetheart.” She turns out to be a psychopath too, indicated by a schizophrenic, fourth wall-breaking monologue that fluctuates between her normal voice and one of a demon. Later on, she attacks a quaint yet quarreling suburban couple. For a movie that essentially has its production design done by Halloween, her hamminess is more spirited than most character flourishes here. 
And yes, given that this is a movie about psychopaths, there are some killers in masks, some of their violence involving the weak script idea of revenge. But as a character shrugs in the script, fitting with the film's middle school-level interest in wisdom: “There ain’t no why to evil.” 
All this carnage is loosely connected, sometimes with different attacks spliced back and forth, but the stakes are zilch. Characters, whether considered to be psychopaths or not, are treated with the care of blood bags that exist simply to explode, if not before a menacing soundtrack needle-drop or rambling monologue. For whatever inspiration “Psychopaths” has, as a type of chaos so pure that it lacks substance, it drags. To call it an “experiment” would be to acknowledge that it has a purpose.

“Exercise” might be a better word, however, as Keating is truly an accomplished composer with the instruments of filmmaking. There is a precision in framing, color, lighting, parallel editing and even sound mixing that makes “Psychopaths” more digestible than its screenplay would suggest. Whatever the hell is happening on screen or whoever is being cut up or mutilated, the film is built from dedication. 

But unless the ambition of “Psychopaths” is to motivate Michael Haneke to remake “Funny Games” for a second time, its efforts are gravely misplaced. The self-aware conceits of Keating’s film get it nowhere, except farther away from having any major impact. At its best, “Psychopaths” is an empty rebellion of a genre movie. At its worst, it’s a confounding piece of shiny trash.

FINAL RATING: 1/10 FOR THE GENRE AND 1/10 OVERALL. PURE TRASH.


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