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INCREDIBLE ACTION AND CRIME TO WATCH IN - GAME NIGHT (2018) - FILM REVIEW

Game Night (2018)




A group of friends who meet regularly for game nights find themselves trying to solve a murder mystery.

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23 February 2018 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Noche de juegos  »

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"Game Night," about game-loving partiers who get drawn into a web of danger, is a raucously funny film that has a knack for going right up to the edge of nastiness. Written by Mark Perez and directed by John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein—who cowrote "Horrible Bosses" and "The Incredible Burt Wonderstone" and helmed the 2015 "Vacation"—it starts out borderline ludicrous and keeps piling on improbabilities, until it leaves our world behind and become an exercise in absurdity.
The main couple, Max and Annie (Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams), hosts a regular game night at their suburban home. A cleverly-edited opening montage shows that games like Pictionary, Scrabble and charades are the foundation of their relationship and led to their marriage. The game night covered in this movie includes Ryan (Billy Magnussen), a dimwitted friend of Annie's; Sarah (Sharon Horgan), Ryan's much smarter date; the husband-wife team of Kevin and Michelle (Lamorne Morris and Kylie Bunbury); and Max's estranged brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler), who's a success in ways that Max can only dream about. 

Then Brooks invites the guests out to his rich-guy house for a different kind of game night, modeled on those murder mystery dinner parties that became a fad a few years ago, and "Game Night" becomes a roller coaster ride, whisking the audience through broad slapstick, deadpan exchanges and imminent threats that sometimes erupt into mayhem. 
Brooks gets kidnapped in a home invasion that everybody else assumes is just part of the game, and threatened with murder if the others don't deliver a precious Faberge egg to a scary-voiced mastermind who's giving them orders from afar. The rest of the team splits up into pairs and tries to solve the mystery in their own way, their paths periodically re-crossing, only to diverge again. 
If you've seen "The Game" or other films in which an escapist adventure turns weird and frightening, you'll anticipate some but not all of the twists and turns of "Game Night," and you'll appreciate the way that the screenwriter and directors tie them to the psychology of the characters, and structure the film as a journey of personal as well as narrative discovery. The brothers' mutual resentment and rivalry is nearly as important here as it was in "The Game." Max and Annie's inability to conceive a child comes into play as well, as do the psychologies and pasts of other game night participants. A subplot about Kevin's obsession with figuring out whether Michelle was ever unfaithful to him has a terrific payoff that flips over on itself. There are juicy bits for supporting players as well, including Jeffrey Wright as an FBI agent, Danny Huston as a decadent rotter (his specialty), Michael C. Hall as a scary criminal known as The Bulgarian, and Jesse Plemons as the divorced and seemingly personality-free cop who lives in the same cul-de-sac as Max and Annie and seems obsessed with getting invited to game night again. None of these characters are quite as they appear on first or second glance. 

"Game Night" is a nearly perfect entertainment for adults over a certain age. There's a madcap car chase, a violent incident that leads to impromptu surgery, and a house party with echoes of the masked spectacle in "Eyes Wide Shut," but it's all entwined with commentary about aging, disappointment, doomed romanticism and sibling rivalry.e actors put it all across with flair—especially Bateman and McAdams, who complete each other's thoughts so deftly that they really do seem as if they've been married forever, and Plemons, who steals every scene he's in through deft underplaying. And while there are a few touching moments, the film never tries to claim sentimental or revelatory power it hasn't earned.

Control of tone is essential in any film that doesn't adhere to a familiar formula, and luckily for the audience, Daley and Bernstein are on top of things. They've got a knack for figuring how how far is too far, pushing right up to the border, then stopping with one toe over the line. The understated cartoonishness, anchored in Bateman and McAdams' deft teamwork, helps a lot. Characters keep sustaining physical injuries that would kill or incapacitate people in reality, only to bounce back and resume the game, but their mishaps are calibrated so that they just seem to smack a bit of sense into them, like an exploding cigar or an anvil on the head in a Bugs Bunny short. This is one of the best surprises of a still-young movie year: a comedy that takes nothing seriously except fun.



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DISCOVER JESUS FROM A DIFFERENT SIDE - CONFESSIONS OF A TEENAGE JESUS JERK (2018) - FILM REVIEW

Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk (2017)



A teenage boy comes of age during the Reagan years, discovering that he really enjoys many pleasurable things that his family- and his religion- frown upon...

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2017 (USA)  »

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Eric Stoltz adapts Tony DuShane's autobiographical novel about a teen trying to be a good Jehovah's Witness.
"This all happened because of a Sears catalog," admits a post-adolescent voice in Eric Stoltz's Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk, referring to the erotic power of tame underwear ads in a pre-internet household whose parents did their best to keep racy, "worldly" temptations at bay. That's one of many details giving the ring of truth to this memoir about coming of age as a deeply conservative Christian, a period piece about the battle between hormones and Heavenly thought. But the scene-setting works better than the storytelling in this sincere but clumsy picture, whose script (by first-timer Tony DuShane, author of the book it was based on) makes a bit of a muddle of the interactions between its teen and adult Jehovah's Witnesses (and the occasional troublemaking nonbeliever). Though some adult refugees from puritan upbringings may appreciate seeing their lives represented here, the film's commercial outlook is dim.

The "Jesus jerk" in question, Gabe (Sasha Feldman), is really less of a jerk than someone being jerked around by others' unreasonable expectations. Expectations like the belief, firmly if inexplicably held by adult males at his church, that he and his 16-year-old buddies can get through high school without masturbating. The film knows better, and does a good job of conveying Gabe's cognitive dissonance: He routinely gives in to this and other temptations, but his self-image remains that of a pure-living Witness who will come out on the right side of Armageddon.

Gabe drinks from time to time, is relaxed about penny-ante sins and even goes along with it when his bad-girl cousin Karen (Lauren Lakis) pulls down her top and puts his hand on her. (That happens right after she makes a casual reference to being molested by her father, something the movie is bizarrely uninterested in.) Shortly after this scene, we watch Gabe at school, where he is getting up the nerve to express interest in a girl. Viewers may be puzzled by the weight given to the first time he touches the hand of his second- or third-choice classmate crush, given the previous encounter. But the breast-grope actually hasn't happened yet — one of several instances where chronology is jumbled for no apparent reason.

Also strange is the insertion, at seemingly random points, of documentary-like interviews with older Jehovah's Witnesses. Little of what they say reveals much about the story's themes, and none of it bears specifically on its characters. Given how little the talking-head moments add, it's hard to justify breaking up a story that is already having a hard time pulling us along with it.
Gabe's romantic anxieties are universal enough that we can empathize on autopilot, even if it sometimes seems there are enough beautiful girls making themselves available that he shouldn't be worried. (In some cases, the script invests time in establishing a potential love interest only to forget about her completely.) And though it's less universal, the screenplay helps outsiders understand how a minor or non-existent infraction might get a believer "disfellowshipped," or shunned by his peers for a set period of time. (One adult is said to have been exiled for the sin of voting in the presidential election.)

But the film is more opaque about some intrachurch controversies that seemingly cause its most dramatic event. We twice catch a glimpse of a book, Crisis of Conscience, that seems to be causing believers to question their leaders; a few mentions of a controversy in Malawi back this up. But we're not given nearly enough information to understand how this could lead to a climactic tragedy, or to guess what it says about the Elders who lead Gabe's church.

Gabe's father (Paul Adelstein) is one of those Elders, a stern man who believes he's loving his child by trying to keep him away from the Devil. We know the type, but Confessions hints at darker specifics (his physical anger; his wife's sneaky drinking) that, if explored more sensitively, might have made us care about the man and feel for his predicament. It's tough to raise a child when you truly believe that being human will condemn him to hell. And, at least in this case, it's hard to care much about the son without understanding the father who made him this way.

At the end I just wanted to say that I am not sure about giving 4 or 5 stars. But I decide to go for...
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RAMPAGE (2018) - TRAILER

Rampage (2018)



Based on the classic 1980s video game featuring apes and monsters destroying cities.

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(screenplay by), (screenplay by) | 3 more credits »

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Primatologist Davis Okoye shares an unshakable bond with George, the extraordinarily intelligent gorilla who has been in his care since birth. But a rogue genetic experiment gone awry transforms this gentle ape into a raging monster. As these newly created monsters tear across North America, destroying everything in their path, Okoye teams with a discredited genetic engineer to secure an antidote, fighting his way through an ever-changing battlefield, not only to halt a global catastrophe but to save the fearsome creature that was once his friend.

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20 April 2018 (USA)  »

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Rampage  »

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NETFLIX HIGHLIGHT IN FEBRUARY - IRREPLACEABLE YOU (2018) - FILM REVIEW

Irreplaceable You (2018)



A couple who have known each other since 8 are destined to be together until death do them apart.

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16 February 2018 (USA)  »

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Perfeita Pra Você  »

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When Abbie, who thinks she is pregnant due to the bloating in her belly, instead gets a diagnosis of Stage 4 cancer, her reaction is stunned shock, followed by a quip to her fiance, "At least we won't have to pay for college." He replies, "Unless it's a really smart tumor." There's a pause and he murmurs, "Too soon." "Irreplaceable You," written by actress Bess Wohl and directed by Stephanie Laing, is filled with dialogue like that, self-conscious "quips" meant to be witty gallows' humor, an adorable spin on denial. Grief does not look a certain way (and the expectation it should does a lot of damage to those going through it), but the language here is off-putting, skipping off a too-beautiful and insistently color-corrected surface. The dialogue creates an arch and artificial mood, never sounding like real talk despite the clearly talented actors (Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Michiel Huisman) playing the roles. The film itself seems to be in denial about its own story.

The "adorable" quality starts early when it shows how Abbie and Sam met. They were eight years old on a field trip to an aquarium, and when the tour guide describes how the monogamous deep-sea angler fish bites its chosen mate, young Abbie leans over and bites Sam. They have been together ever since in an uninterrupted continuum of monogamous coupledom. Her cancer diagnosis is the first event to tarnish their eternal intimacy. Adding to the sense of unreality, the couple live in a gigantic sun-drenched loft in New York, which looks interior-decorated by a professional. Abbie doesn't know how to cook a chicken. They eat takeout. Why, then, do they have an industrial sized kitchen, the walls lined with professional-grade cookware? (The tendency to put New York film characters into completely unrealistic apartments is so common as to be mundane, and when a film accepts the space challenges most New Yorkers live with—even New Yorkers with good jobs—it's such a welcome breath of reality.) "Irreplaceable You" gives cancer the most glamorous backdrop possible.

Abbie's reaction to her diagnosis is to search for a new mate for Sam, someone who can take care of him when she's gone, who can make sure he doesn't wear mismatched socks. She creates an online profile for him and interviews potential candidates. She never seems sick, despite the seriousness of her diagnosis. She throws up from her treatment once. She's not exhausted or in pain. Nothing changes in her physically. Maybe it’s unreasonable to be annoyed by this, but if you’ve experienced the death of a loved one from cancer, you know how bad it can get, how extreme the challenges can be. In “Irreplaceable You”, cancer is used mostly as a plot point to get the story started. Abbie’s cancer diagnosis is implicit as opposed to explicit, and there is no sense over the course of the film—with one or two exceptions—that the cancer is having any effect on her at all. This is a huge missed opportunity.

The cancer support group Abbie attends is filled with characters played by heavy-hitting actors, many of whom far surpass both Abbie and Sam in interest. These scenes generate real sparks. There's Steve Coogan, as the group leader, who insists the crocheting he makes them do is "not a metaphor." Kate McKinnon plays a woman in such denial about her diagnosis she insists, with bright manic eyes, that she's "blessed.” Her positive attitude drives everyone crazy. She vibrates with a tragic intensity missing from the rest of the film. Christopher Walken plays Myron, a man with a terminal diagnosis, who befriends Abbie. They spend time together. Their friendship is a huge aspect of the film. Myron is mainly there to be a sounding board for Abbie's "project" to marry Sam off. He thinks she's insane and tells her she is displaying signs of "anticipatory grief," an insightful comment.

There are some good scenes between Abbie and her mother (the wonderful Tamara Tunie), where Abbie pushes her mother away, resenting the worried interference. There are some good scenes between Myron and Abbie, especially when Myron opens up about his own marriage. Walken's line readings are so his own the language takes wing for the first time. "Ugly. Purple. Couch," he says. "My wife put it in the living room and I was angry for two years." He brings with him the world-weary gravitas of a man who has seen it all, who still enjoys the simple things, who will miss his wife (Jacki Weaver), will even miss the ugly. purple. couch.

In an episode of the television series "thirtysomething," during the arc where Nancy (Patricia Wettig) develops cancer, Nancy spends more time with a new friend from her support group than she does with her family. This causes extreme tension with her husband who wants to soak up as much time with her as possible. But the people in Nancy's support group are the only ones who understand—and are not afraid of—what she is going through. These kinds of in-depth, difficult explorations are beyond "Irreplaceable You"'s capabilities. There's real poignancy in Myron's character and in Kate McKinnon's character. Abbie's journey—from denial to acceptance—is important, but it's wrapped up in a package that wants to be charming, wants to be inspirational from the first frame with its posthumous voiceover and swelling music.
I'm being hard on the film. It is not without its charms. But "Irreplaceable You" pays a price for prioritizing charm. The emotional process of accepting death—for those suffering and for those who will be left behind—is exacerbated by changes in the body, the impossibility of pain management, the medical bills, the sense survivors have of their loved one moving far away, even before death, into a realm where no one else can follow, the tide going out slowly, excruciatingly. Even though "Irreplaceable You" tries to avoid this reality, it shows up anyway. It's there in Kate McKinnon's desperate gleam of gaiety, in Christopher Walken's exhausted acceptance, in Tamara Tunie's sadness hidden behind a chipper competent surface. These all feel like emissaries from the real world. Too bad the main narrative doesn't take place in the real world at all.



LOVE IS A THRILL - DOUBLE LOVER (2018) - FILM REVIEW

Double Lover (2017)

L'amant double (original title)


Chloé, a fragile young woman, falls in love with her psychoanalyst, Paul. A few months later she moves in with him, but soon discovers that her lover is concealing a part of his identity.

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(novel), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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Disenchanted with the ephemeral glamour of the modelling world, Chloé, a vulnerable Parisian woman of 25, is convinced that the severe and persistent abdominal pains she's been suffering, stem mainly from a psychosomatic disorder. As a result, the reserved beauty will soon find herself on the couch of the charming therapist, Dr Paul Meyer, nevertheless, the mutual and unfailing sexual attraction between them will make it impossible to continue with the therapy. Before long, the ecstatic, yet unexplored lovers will move in together, however, Paul's obscure past will inevitably lead Chloé to the conclusion that there's definitely more to him than meets the eye. Is the doe-eyed woman lured into a world of hallucinations and dream-like sequences?  


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26 May 2017 (France)  »

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Amant Double  »

Box Office

Gross USA:

$19,040, 15 February 2018

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“Double Lover” brought back memories of 1994’s dreadful Bruce Willis erotic thriller "Color of Night." That film features a corruptible shrink getting sexually involved with one of his patients. All manner of plot twists and turns abound, none of which make a lick of sense because the filmmakers thought we’d be too titillated to notice. But there is nothing sexy about “Color of Night,” not even in the coveted VHS unrated version that gave viewers a glimpse of Willis’ junk. It is violent, dumb and thanks to the puritanical streak about sex that runs through American cinema, practically neutered.

As evidenced by sexy thrillers like “Swimming Pool,” director François Ozon doesn’t have a puritanical bone in his body. The French do softcore erotic nonsense better than anybody—and they do it without much restraint. Ozon’s camera leers at the bodies of his lovers as they go through the motions of simulated sex or lounge around stark naked. And while “Double Lover” is as squeamish as most Cinemax-style wank material about a certain male organ, it’s more than charitable about its female counterpart. One can’t be faulted for expecting greatness from a film that opens with a close-up of a stretched out vagina morphing into an eye.
In that opening scene, Chloé (Marine Vacth) is visiting her gynecologist, who tells her that her chronic stomach problems are psychosomatic. Chloé opts to get some therapy at the offices of Peter Meyer (Jérémie Renier). Peter is hot but dweeby and wears the kind of glasses that used to adorn librarians in '70s-era porn. You expect him to sweep off his specs to reveal a sex machine once he becomes romantically involved with Chloé, but she’s bored to tears by his mechanical rumpy-pumpy. Still, she moves in with him and her cat, Milo, whom Peter despises. Peter doesn’t like that Milo watches his lackluster erotic performances with the disgust only a feline face can master.

One day, Chloé is riding the bus home from her day job as a museum guard when she spots Peter outside talking to a woman. He’s supposed to be at the hospital seeing his patients at this time, so Chloé senses something’s amiss. Peter denies that it’s him. Chloé has reason to suspect Peter’s a liar; while rummaging through some of his papers, she learns that Peter Meyer is a pseudonym. His last name is really Delord.
Forgetting the adage that curiosity killed the Milo, Chloé goes to investigate the location of Peter’s supposed transgression. She learns that it is the office of another shrink named Louis Delord (also Renier). When she makes a therapy appointment with Louis, she’s stunned to find he looks exactly like Peter, though in a more macho, disheveled way. Louis is Peter’s identical twin, born 15 minutes earlier and the complete opposite of his lesser half. Chloé is intrigued and more than a little turned on. But Louis is mean, brash, foul-mouthed and not below slapping a pregnant Chloé through a glass window. Their sex scenes are of the violent movie variety that has misled men for decades, with Chloé barely offering consent at times. But Louis’ “therapy” is supposed to be better than Peter’s.

So now Chloé is pinballing between nice Peter and bad boy Louis, and your humble reviewer is checking his watch because this has been done hotter, better and less snobbishly hundreds of times before. Then, Ozon starts haphazardly throwing in plot twists that ultimately amount to absolutely nothing. Is Louis really Peter? Is Peter really the evil twin? Whose baby is Chloé carrying? Is Chloé losing her damn mind? What happened to some dying girl named Sandra, and how are the Delord twins involved? And why does Sandra’s mother look like Chloé’s mother? I’ll answer that one: it’s because they’re both played by veteran Jacqueline Bisset, who is the best thing about “Double Lover”.

Twins and doppelgangers are the film’s primary subjects, and Ozon gets some good visual mileage out of the doubles motif. He splits the screen, has his actors reflected in mirrors and moves his camera for Peter in the exact opposite way he moves it for Louis. Ozon’s direction is more interesting than the script he adapted from a Joyce Carol Oates novel. I haven’t read the source material, so I don’t know if it includes the scenes of body horror that turn “Double Lover” into “Humanoids from the Deep” in its last reel. I can also only speculate if the source included parasitic twins, pictures of chewed up fetuses and nods to David Cronenberg’s far superior "Dead Ringers."
What I do know is that something this sleazy should be a lot more fun. I’m not sure if I’m supposed to take anything Ozon threw at me seriously, but his pitches came wrapped in the type of arty airs that always ruins this kind of trash for me. Your horniness may vary.


20 MINUTES - EXTRA LONG - ALL TRAILER OF WEEK 7, 2018




Trailers Included:
( 00:00 ) Rampage Trailer 2
( 02:25 ) Ready Player One Trailer 2
( 04:20 ) The Incredibles 2 Trailer 2
( 05:50 ) A Quiet Place Trailer 3
( 07:35 ) Pacific Rim 2 Trailer 3
( 10:05 ) Batman Ninja US Trailer
( 11:35 ) Josie
( 13:40 ) 10x10
( 15:10 ) Uncle Drew
( 17:15 ) Golden Exits
( 19:10 ) Bent
( 21:15 ) Marrowbone Trailer 2
( 23:15 ) The Last Movie Star
( 25:05 ) The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society
( 27:40 ) Gringo
( 29:25 ) Cover Versions
( 30:45 ) Marie Magdalene Trailer 2
( 31:45 ) The Layover Trailer 2
( 32:30 ) Fullmetal Alchemist Netflix US Trailer



Thanks for watching and have fun watching movies.

THE MERCY (2018) - FILM REVIEW

The Mercy (2018)


The incredible story of amateur sailor Donald Crowhurst and his solo attempt to circumnavigate the globe. The struggles he confronted on the journey while his family awaited his return is one of the most enduring mysteries of recent times.

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The incredible story of Donald Crowhurst , an amateur sailor who competed in the 1968 Sunday Times Golden Globe Race in the hope of becoming the first person in history to single-handedly circumnavigate the globe without stopping. With an unfinished boat and his business and house on the line, Donald leaves his wife, Clare and their children behind, hesitantly embarking on an adventure on his boat the Teignmouth Electron. The story of Crowhurst's dangerous solo voyage and the struggles he confronted on the epic journey while his family awaited his return is one of the most enduring mysteries of recent times.

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2018 (USA)  »

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Deep Water  »

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2.35 : 1

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Trivia

One of two biopics about Donald Crowhurst slated for release in the UK only a few weeks apart. The other, the independently produced Crowhurst (2017), starring Justin Salinger as Donald Crowhurst, was finished earlier, but the distributor of The Mercy bought it and delayed its release until a month after that of this film.

A handsome period bio-drama about the doomed final voyage of yachtsman and fraudster Donald Crowhurst, The Mercy comes with an illustrious Britfilm pedigree. The director is James Marsh, whose credits include Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire and acclaimed Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz headline the cast. And yet this unresolved maritime mystery feels oddly flat and functional, diluting a tragic tale full of unanswered questions into an anodyne middlebrow weepie. It opens on U.K. and Irish screens later this week, with a staggered global rollout to follow.

With its evergreen dramatic themes of grand ambition, financial desperation and human folly, Crowhurst’s story has already inspired stage plays, novels, poems, documentaries and even operas. Another big-screen treatment of the same story, Simon Rumley’s indie psycho-thriller Crowhurst, is also set to bow in the coming months. In a bold tactical move, The Mercy co-producers Studiocanal have also bought the rights to Rumley’s film, agreeing to release it soon after their bigger-budget rival version plays in theaters.
In 1968, Britain's Sunday Times newspaper launches its Golden Globe Race offering big cash prizes for the first ever single-handed, around-the-world, non-stop sailing voyage. Both the first and the fastest competitors will win £5000 each, the equivalent of around $80,000 today. An amateur sailor with four young children and mounting debts, Crowhurst (Firth) signs up for the race, hoping to reverse his bad luck and promote his current venture, an electronic nautical navigation device. Striking a high-stakes funding deal with businessman Stanley Best (Ken Stott), he sets to work preparing an innovative triple-hulled yacht for the race, the Teignmouth Electron.

Despite his own last-minute doubts, the reservations of wife Clare (Weisz) and ominous technical issues with his experimental boat, Crowhurst finally sets out to sea in late October. But his plans unravel almost immediately, falling far behind the competition. In an increasingly desperate state, with no hope of winning, he makes the fateful decision to abandon the race, lingering off the coast of South America and filing fake journey logs charting his fictional progress. He even makes landfall in Argentina, breaking the rules of the race, a detour that Marsh turns into a welcome injection of farcical human drama.
By early July 1969, after eight months of almost total solitude, and facing near certain financial ruin if he returns to Britain, Crowhurst suffers some kind of mental breakdown. He begins writing florid, delusional, quasi-religious screeds in his journals, one of which provides The Mercy with its title. His disappearance on the lonely high seas, most likely a suicide, is presented by Marsh in a suitably vague, symbolic manner. His unmanned yacht was found intact and adrift in the Atlantic on July 10,1969, but his fate remains an unsolved mystery almost half a century later.

Peppered with tender flashbacks to conversations between Crowhurst and his family, The Mercy frames this story primarily as a heart-tugging personal tragedy. Which of course it was, on one level, but Marsh’s conventional bio-drama approach does not yield great rewards cinematically. A bolder retelling of these strange events might have found richer psychological, political or social dimensions to Crowhurst’s disastrous failed mission.

To his credit, Marsh moves the story along at a breezy pace and milks maximum eerie effect from the sense-warping oddness of being out alone on the vast ocean, assailed by a constant soundtrack of creaks and cracks and slapping waves. In a departure from Rumley’s film, which had strong psychological horror undertones, The Mercy depicts Crowhurst’s descent into hallucinatory madness in relatively restrained, poetic terms. But while the two pictures vary wildly in tone and style, both ultimately struggle to resolve the same dilemma: There is little inherently dramatic about watching one man going progressively insane inside the cramped cabin of a sailing boat.

Firth’s performance, reliably solid but low on emotional intensity, only reinforces this general flatness of mood. David Thewlis brings some much-needed comic fizz as Crowhurst’s bumptious press agent, but Weisz’s acting skills are shamefully underused in her handful of bland vignettes as a passive, dutiful spouse.
The Mercy makes Crowhurst more hero than anti-hero, laying the brunt of blame for his death on arm-twisting business partners and sensation-hungry media vultures rather than on his own reckless adventurism. “Last week you were selling hope, now you are selling blame,” Clare angrily berates reporters when tragedy strikes. This soapy, simplistic line encapsulates a key problem of Marsh’s film, which constantly seeks the dry land of moral clarity where there is only an unfathomable ocean of uncertainty.



SILENCE PLEASE THIS IS - A QUIET PLACE (2018) - TRAILER 2

A Quiet Place (2018)



A family lives an isolated existence in utter silence, for fear of an unknown threat that follows and attacks at any sound.

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(screenplay by), (screenplay by) | 3 more credits »

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Release Date:

6 April 2018 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Um Lugar Silencioso  »

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